MA International Relations and European Studies
Central European University

Governance in the European Union and
the Challenge of Enlargement

Winter Term 2003

Lecturer: Uli Sedelmeier


Course Requirements ][ Reading Requirements ][ Course Outline ][ Seminar Readings

Course Objectives

The scope of the eastern enlargement of the European Union (EU) creates pressures on most of the EU’s policies, its institutions, its decision-making system, as well as the integration model more generally. An understanding of these aspects of the EU and their historical evolution is therefore crucial in order to understand the challenges that the EU and the applicants have to confront. In this course we will examine in which ways enlargement creates adjustment pressures, the options for adaptations that figure in the debate, and the politics that favour certain options rather than others. Throughout the course we will identify in the various issue areas the factors that facilitate or impede EU enlargement and that bias the distribution of the adjustment burden between the EU incumbents and the applicants.

Since the subject is very topical and keeps evolving, much of the more recent developments of policy and of the debate are not yet published in books or articles. This implies that the preparation of seminar presentations or essays will require a greater extent of research and initiative on your part. In this sense, the course will in many respects resemble a workshop.


Course Requirements

[Nb the requirements might be changed according to the number of participants in the seminar]

1. Seminar participation (12.5%)
In order to take account of the importance attached to active participation in this seminar, participation will be a separate part of your grade, based on your participation week-by-week. I know that some find speaking out in the seminar more difficult than others, but this is a skill that can be learned; and attempts to contribute will be given credit, so you should not have to worry. By contrast, non-attendance, or consistent failure to participate might attract negative grades. In broad terms, participation will be graded as follows: regular attendance (but no participation) will get you a C+; good faith efforts at participation will get you a into the B/B+ range; valuable contributions will get you into the B+/A range. If you miss more than 3 classes, participation will be graded F.

2. Seminar Presentation (12.5%)
You have to give one in-depth presentation of a particular seminar’s topic (please sign up for a subject on the list outside my office). It is important that you have a discussion of the subject with me, since you will usually have to cover more ground than the required reading. Usually this will also involve an overview of the evolving debate and recent developments, which might require you to do some research. For the presentation you should prepare a one-page outline for the seminar participants, which gives an indication of the structure of your presentation, and summarises the most important substantive points.

3. Presentation and Essay (25%)
You will have to give a presentation of the development and outcome of accession negotiations in one particular policy area that was salient in the enlargement debate. In seminars 18 to 22 we will we draw on these presentations to sketch the process of the accession negotiations and its final conclusions. We will allocate these presentations during the seminar. You should research the negotiations in the policy area in question drawing on secondary literature, current affairs material, and primary sources. You should try to give a sense of how the negotiation positions of the most relevant actors (such as particular member states, the European Commission, and particular accession candidates) were formulated, how these might have evolved, and how the final outcome of the negotiations came about. You should write up your presentation as an essay (approx. 2000 words). The deadline for the submission of the essay is the Monday after the presentation.

4. Essay (12.5%)
You will have to write one essay on one of the seminar topics (approx. 1,500 words). The ‘further reading’ is an indication of useful literature. You are very welcome to consult about the subject of your essays. To ensure a spread of the essays across the subjects, please sign up for one subject on the list outside my door. The deadline for the submission of the essay is as follows: for essays that cover the subject of a Tuesday seminar, the deadline is the Monday before; for essays that cover the subject of a Thursday seminar, the deadline is the Wednesday before.

5. Term Paper (37.5%)
You will have to submit a term paper of approximately 4000 words. You can choose a topic which particularly interests you within the framework of the course, but you are strongly advised to consult with me about your choice. The paper may also be an expanded version of the seminar presentation or essay and it may serve as a starting point for the MA dissertation.


Reading Requirements

The week-by-week schedule gives an indication of the required reading for each seminar. In addition, I have indicated ‘Further Reading’ as a guide for those preparing seminar presentations or essays. However, since the subject is very topical, you will be expected throughout to consult current affairs media and primary sources. You should familiarise yourselves with the various publications of EC/EU institutions, taking full advantage of the European Documentation Centre in Budapest, and Europa, the European Union's server.

You should also try to read regularly the coverage of the EU in the press. The Financial Times and the European Voice have good coverage of EU issues. Agence Europe (Bulletin Quotidien Europe), both the daily bulletin and the documents series, has excellent coverage of the day-by-day activities of the EU institutions. Further useful sources include the monthly Bulletin of the EC/EU, the European Foreign Policy Bulletin, and the Europe Information Service, as well as specifically on EU policy towards central and eastern Europe, Together in Europe and EuropeanDialogue. An excellent bibliographical guide is the bi-monthly European Access.

The European Research Papers Archive is a key access point for online series in European integration research; other working paper series that are accessible online include the Enlargement Briefing papers by DG IV (research) of the Secretariat General of the European Parliament; the European Policy Centre's Challenge Europe, or the Chaillot Papers of the WEU Institute for Security Studies. For background; regular updates, and key documents, also consult the website of the Commission's DG for Enlargement, EurActiv.com's Focus Enlargement and EUobserver. For information on research-in-progress on the subject, see the ESRC's 'One Europe Or Several' Programme.

Journals that are generally useful include:
European Integration Online Papers
Journal of Common Market Studies
Journal of European Public Policy
International Affairs
West European Politics
Common Market Law Review
European Union Politics
European Economy
Economic Policy
European Law Review
International Organization


Background Reading

By now there is also fairly long list of book publications on the subject. The list below gives you a fairly comprehensive indication of the literature (that however often outdates quickly):



Course Outline

Introduction: EU Enlargement and Policies towards Central Europe

Seminar 1       Previous EU Enlargements                     (7 Jan.)
Seminar 2       EU policy towards the CEECs (-1995)     (9 Jan.)
Seminar 3       EU policy towards the CEECs (1995-)     (14 Jan.)
Seminar 4       Conceptualising EU Enlargement             (16 Jan.)
 

Institutional Reform
Seminar 5        Institutional Representation and Efficiency of Decision-Making (21 Jan.)
Seminar 6        Flexible Integration and the Institutional Model (23 Jan.)

Policy Reform

Seminar 7        The Common Agricultural Policy         (28 Jan.)
Seminar 8        The Structural Funds and Cohesion     (30 Jan.)
Seminar 9        The Budget and Redistribution             (4 Feb.)

The Challenge of Extending Particular Policies
Seminar 10       The Single Market and Regulatory Alignment     (6 Feb.)
Seminar 11       Justice and Home Affairs                                 (11 Feb.)
Seminar 12       Common Foreign and Security Policy                 (13 Feb.)

Redefining Relations with other Candidates and New Neighbours
Seminar 13       Turkey                                                     (18 Feb.)
Seminar 14       The Countries of South Eastern Europe        (20 Feb.)
Seminar 15       Ukraine and Russia                                     (25 Feb.)

Accession Negotiations
Seminar 16        Guest lecture by a practitioner of EU enlargement (tbc) (27 Feb.)
Seminar 17        Role Play: EU Accession Negotiations      (Sat. 1 March (tbc))
                         (instead of seminar on 20 March)
Seminar 18       Accession Negotiations I           (4 March)
Seminar 19       Accession Negotiations II         (6 March)
                             Deadline for Submission of Term Paper Outlines: 10 March
Seminar 20       Accession Negotiations III        (11 March)
Seminar 21       Accession Negotiations IV        (13 March)
Seminar 22       Accession Negotiations V         (18 March)

No seminar on 20 March

Deadline for Submission of Term Papers: 24 March Discussion and Conclusions
Seminar 23        Discussion (25 March)
Seminar 24        Conclusions (27 March)



Course Outline and Seminar Readings
 
 
Overview: EU Enlargement and EU Policy towards Central Europe

Seminar 1            Previous Enlargements

Christopher Preston (1997): Enlargement and Integration in the European Union (London: Routledge), pp. 3-22; 227-235.

Further Reading:



Seminar 2        EU Policy Towards Central and Eastern Europe (1989-1995):
                        From ‘Normalisation’ to Pre-accession

Sedelmeier, Ulrich and Helen Wallace (1996): Policies towards Central and Eastern Europe, in Wallace and Wallace (eds.) (1996): Policy-Making in the European Union, 3rd edition (Oxford University Press), pp. 353-387.

Further Reading:


Seminar 3            EU Policy Towards Central and Eastern Europe (1995 -):
                            From Pre-accession to Accession Negotiations

Sedelmeier, Ulrich and Helen Wallace (2000): Eastern Enlargement: Strategy or Second Thoughts?, in Wallace and Wallace (eds.) (2000): Policy-Making in the European Union, 4th edition (Oxford University Press), pp. 427-460.

Further Reading:



Seminar 4            Conceptualising EU Enlargement and EU Policy towards the CEECs

Frank Schimmelfennig and Ulrich Sedelmeier (2002): Theorising EU Enlargement – Research Focus, Hypotheses, and the State of Research, Journal of European Public Policy, 9(4): 500-528.

Further Reading:



 
Institutional Reform

Seminar 5    Institutional Representation and Efficiency of Decision-Making

Bart Kerremans (1998): The Political and Institutional Consequences of Widening: Capacity and Control in an Enlarged Council, in Pierre-Henri Laurent and Marc Maresceau (eds.): The State of the European Union, Vol. 4: Deepening and Widening (Boulder, Co.: Lynnne Rienner), pp. 87-109.

Further Reading:



Seminar 6    ‘Flexible Integration’ and the Institutional Model

Helen Wallace (2000): Flexibility: A Tool of Integration or a Restraint on Disintegration? in Karlheinz Neunreither and Antje Wiener (eds.): European Integration After Amsterdam (Oxford University Press), 175-191.

Further Reading:


Internal Policy Reform

Seminar 7    The Common Agricultural Policy

Alan Mayhew (1998): Recreating Europe (Cambridge University Press), pp. 236-281.

Further Reading:



Seminar 8    The Structural Funds and Cohesion

Alan Mayhew (1998): Recreating Europe (Cambridge University Press), pp. 282-299.

Further Reading:



Seminar 9    The Budget and Redistribution

Alan Mayhew (1998): Recreating Europe (Cambridge University Press), pp. 300-311.

Further Reading:


The Challenges of Extending Particular Policies

Seminar 10    The Single Market and Regulatory Alignment

Alasdair R. Young and Helen Wallace (2000): ‘A Larger and More Divers Market’, chapter 5 in Regulatory Politics in the Enlarging European Union (Manchester: Manchester University Press), pp. 100-126.

Further Reading:



Seminar 11    Justice and Home Affairs

Alan Mayhew (1998): Recreating Europe (Cambridge University Press), pp. 332-343.

Heather Grabbe (2000): The Sharp Edges of Europe: Extending Schengen Eastwards, International Affairs, 76 (3): 519-36.

Further Reading:



Seminar 12    Common Foreign and Security Policy

Emil Kirchner (1999): Second Pillar and Eastern Enlargement. The Prospects for a European Security and Defence Identity, in James Sperling (ed): Two Tiers or Two Speeds? (Manchester Univeristy Press) pp.46-62.

Further Reading:


Policies towards Special Candidates and Partners

Seminar 13    Turkey

Ziya Onis (2000): Luxembourg, Helsinki and Beyond: Towards an Interpretation of Recent Turkey-EU Relations, Government and Opposition, 35(4): 463-83.

Further Reading:



Seminar 14    The Countries of South Eastern Europe

Lykke Friis and Anna Murphy (2000): Negotiating in a Time of Crisis: The EU’s Response to the Military Conflict in Kosovo, Robert Schuman Centre Working Paper No. 2000/20.

Further Reading:



Seminar 15    Ukraine and Russia

Stephen White, Ian McAllister and Margot Light (2002): Enlargement and the New Outsiders Journal of Common Market Studies 40(1): 135-53.

Further Reading:


Accession Negotiations

Seminar 16       Guest lecture by a practitioner of EU enlargement (tbc)
 

Seminar 17  Accession Negotiations Role Play  [Sat. 1 March!! (tbc)star
In this seminar we will simulate EU accession negotiations through a role play. You will be allocated a specific role (e.g. a member state, the European Commission or an applicant country) and you will receive your briefing in advance. Read these briefings carefully and do not discuss them with the other students before the seminar.

Background reading:
Graham Avery and Fraser Cameron (1998): The Enlargement of the European Union (Sheffield: Sheffield Academic Press), pp. 23-33.
 

Seminars 18-22

In these five seminars we will sketch the development and outcome of accession negotiations that are scheduled to be concluded by the end of 2002. The presentations will trace the evolution of accession negotiations in one particular policy area that was salient in the enlargement debate. Preparation of these presentations will not only involve reviews of the literature but also search of primary sources, and news media specialised on EU affairs, such Agence Europe (Bulletin Quotidien Europe) (in English). You should identify the negotiation positions of the most relevant actors (such as particular member states, the European Commission, and particular accession candidates), why these positions were taken (including, e.g. the role of interest groups and different political parties), how they might have evolved in the course of the negotiations, and how the final outcome of the negotiations came about. You should also pay attention to how these positions have evolved internally

Seminar 18           Accession Negotiations I:
                          Social Policy, Environmental Policy, Free Movement of Labour

Seminar 19           Accession Negotiations II:
                          Sale of Land, Competition Policy, Transport (Road Haulage)

Seminar 20           Accession Negotiations III:
                          Visa Policy, Nuclear Safety, Consumer Protection

Deadline for Submission of Term Paper Outlines: 10 March   Seminar 21            Accession Negotiations IV:
                            (Human Rights/Democracy), Energy, Safeguard Clauses/Monitoring

Seminar 22            Accession Negotiations V:
                            Agriculture, Structural Funds, the Budget
 
 

star Term paper due 24 March 2001, 9.30 amstar
Discussions and Conclusions

Seminar 23 Discussion

Seminar 24 Conclusions


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